Pokhran Nuclear Test Essay for Students

The world today stands on the brink of a crisis of existence. The arm-race rivalry has reached such a high pitch that the Super Powers seem to be seeking for an opportunity for a final showdown. In the context of increasing global tension and the unprecedented arms race, common man everywhere feels bewildered about the fate of the human race and its civilization. It is really a pity that enormous sums are being spent on nuclear arms while millions of people are starving all over the world. Yet the question of whether India herself should be a nuclear power is a puzzling question to which no definite answer can yet be given. India successfully test multiple nuclear bombs at Pokhran in 1998.

On 11 May 1998, India conducted three underground nuclear test in the Pokhran range in Rajasthan Jaisalmer district. Previously, in May 1974, India had conducted its first ‘Peaceful Nuclear Experiment’. It has now been proved that India is now a power which has the right to stand on her own feet in the field of nuclear researches. India conducted these tests on the day of the Buddha Purnima in order to use nuclear power for peaceful purposes only. Pakistan, however, responded by testing two more nuclear bombs within a very short time. The USA and Japan reacted sharply by imposing economic ban against India. An atmosphere of distrust and the Cold War has been generated. Yet some say that in spite of all these obstacles, the prestige of India goes high if she joins the nuclear club.

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India, however, has announced that there would be no deviation of India’s stand for a world—free from nuclear weapons. India also affirms her stand on CTBT (i.e. Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty) that if the Super Powers and other Nuclear Weapon States do not destroy their nuclear stockpile, they have no moral right to ask others to give up their nuclear programme. There is, therefore, no inconsistency at all between India’s pursuit of world peace and her intention of using nuclear energy for ameliorating her self-defence. It gets its ground especially when Pakistan has been desperately trying to be armed with nuclear weapons and China has already become a nuclear power. Yet some others say that India’s message to the world has always been the message of universal love, brotherhood, peace and understanding. Should India neglect all these by embarking upon a nuclear programme?